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Irish Youth Health Promotion Bibliography

This is a comprehensive bibliography of published and unpublished studies, post-graduate theses, and other research studies related to youth health promotion in the youth work sector in Ireland. We are very grateful to the Health Promotion research centre based in NUI Galway for their support in collating this bibliography of research studies.

This bibliography will act as a foundation for an in-depth evaluation of Irish research on youth health promotion. It will assist in identifying gaps in policy and practice, planning future projects and reduce duplication of research.

Example Searches:

Alcohol , Drugs, Mental Health, Sexual Health, Youth Work , Kildare, Youth

The search results show a summary of each resource. Click on the Title of the resource to see the full information.

Mental health & social inclusion; report 36.

Full title: 
Mental health & social inclusion; report 36.
Author: 
National Economic Social Forum (NEFS)
Year: 
2007
Category: 
Context
Citation: 
National Economic Social Forum (2007). Mental health & social inclusion; Report 36. Dublin: National Economic and Social Forum.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
To explore the relationship between mental health and social inclusion in terms of: strengthening positive mental health and well-being for the whole population; the impact of poverty and social exclusion on mental health; and access to services and better recovery rates.
Methodology: 
A consultation process with various stakeholders was carried out; including a public call for submissions of documents relating to this area, public seminars and lectures, and consultations with various stakeholders.
Participants: 
Service users and representatives from youth and children’s organisations, representatives of the Scottish National Programme for Improving Mental Health and Well-being as well as other relevant people who attended the public consultations.
Conclusion: 
Young people are identified as one of the six strategic areas for improving mental health and social inclusion. Early intervention initiatives are identified as the key way to achieve this. This report provides examples of good practice with regard to supportive networks and suicide prevention for mental health promotion and social inclusion of youth. It identifies the need to expand education for citizenship in the school system and in the youth and adult education sectors, with the health and well-being benefits of social and community supports emphasised in this work. It also identifies the importance of raising awareness of mental health and offering a referral service for those who need specific support within the substantial network of youth services identified throughout the country.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
mental health, social inclusion, Ireland.
Length: 
246 pages
Public Accessibility: 
Available from the National Economic and Social Forum.

Qualitative information gleaned from contextual analysis, key informant interviews, a stakeholder meeting, & focus groups with young people in County Galway; general community characteristics.

Full title: 
Qualitative information gleaned from contextual analysis, key informant interviews, a stakeholder meeting, & focus groups with young people in County Galway; general community characteristics.
Author: 
Headstrong, the National centre for youth and mental health.
Category: 
Needs Assessment
Citation: 
Headstrong (2007). Qualitative information gleaned from contextual analysis, key informant interviews, a stakeholder meeting, & focus groups with young people in County Galway. Dublin: Headstrong, The National Centre for Youth and Mental Health.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
To identify the needs and services available to young people in Galway city and County.
Methodology: 
Interviews and focus groups.
Participants: 
Managers of Ballybane Community Centre, of the Neighbourhood Youth Project (NYP), of the Support Programme for Asylum Seekers and Refugee Kids (SPARK), a nurse & counsellor at The Gaf, 6 early school leavers, 13 secondary school students, 8 NUI Galway students, 8 members of The Gaf youth council, 8 children from the Clifden area and the Jigsaw project community stakeholders.
Conclusion: 
A profile of young people in Galway city and County is provided. Many youth service needs identified by young people (e.g. the need to have someone to talk to, for funded youth services, for local activities that would allow youth to “work out their frustrations and energies”) and by service providers (e.g. engagement and maintaining youth involvement, promotion of services, particularly towards suicide prevention) are described.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
youths, profile, needs assessment, Galway
Length: 
60 pages

An exploration into the drug and alcohol related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of early school leavers aged 15-20 years in the West of Ireland.

Full title: 
An exploration into the drug and alcohol related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of early school leavers aged 15-20 years in the West of Ireland.
Author: 
Redmond, S.
Year: 
2008
Category: 
Needs Assessment
Citation: 
Redmond, S. (2008). An exploration into the drug and alcohol related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of early school leavers aged 15-20 years in the West of Ireland. University of Limerick: Unpublished MA Thesis.
Publication Type: 
Master of Arts thesis
Aim: 
To explore drug and alcohol related attitudes, knowledge and behaviours of early school leavers in the West of Ireland.
Methodology: 
A mixed methods approach, triangulation, was employed to collect data. Data collection involved three phases; questionnaires, focus groups and photo-voice.
Participants: 
Questionnaires were completed by 106 young people (47males, 59 females, 15-20 years, mean age 16 years); 22 were involved in three focus groups (14 males, 8 females, mean age 16 years), one per county: Galway, Mayo and Roscommon; and five male (15-16 years) participants in photo-voice. (Photo-voice is a research method that gives the participants a creative opportunity to express themselves, particularly useful for those experiencing language barriers).
Conclusion: 
The findings suggest that while a high proportion of early school leavers use illicit substances, many do not. The study concludes that consistent and appropriate methods are required to engage young people to challenge attitudes to substance use, enhance young people’s knowledge, positively impact their behaviour and utilise normative education. It calls for an emphasis to be placed on providing a range of youth services to meet the needs of young people, and for a more holistic and creative approach to be adopted within the education system to achieve better mental health, social health and emotional health.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
early school leavers, drugs, alcohol, knowledge
Length: 
186 pages

Somewhere to turn to, someone to talk to.

Full title: 
Somewhere to turn to, someone to talk to.
Author: 
Bates, T., Illback, R., Scanlan, F., & Carroll, L.
Year: 
2009
Category: 
Models and tools
Citation: 
Bates, T., Illback, R., Scanlan, F., & Carroll, L. (2009). Somewhere to turn to, someone to talk to. Dublin: Headstrong The National Centre for Youth Mental Health.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
To illustrate the experiences of young people growing up in Ireland, the mental health challenges and difficulties they face and to describe Jigsaw, a community model of services and supports for young people.
Methodology: 
Extensive consultations, public fora, focus groups, questionnaires, interviews and youth mental health workshops were carried out with young people, service providers and community leaders across Ireland over a two year period. Case studies of 2 Jigsaw demonstration sites in action (Galway & Ballymun) were also included.
Participants: 
Numerous service providers, young people and stakeholders across Ireland participated in Headstrong research to develop this document.
Conclusion: 
The report outlines the Jigsaw model, which was shaped by consultations with young people, service providers and examples of best-practice in youth mental health identified internationally. It also describes two case studies of Jigsaw in action in Ireland and how the model can adapt to the unique circumstances of young people and their communities.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
Jigsaw model, case study
Length: 
96 pages

Jigsaw: engaging communities in the development and implementation of youth mental health services and supports in the Republic of Ireland.

Full title: 
Jigsaw: engaging communities in the development and implementation of youth mental health services and supports in the Republic of Ireland.
Author: 
Illback, R., Bates, T., Hodges, C., Galligan, K., Smith, P., Sanders, D., & Dooley, B.
Year: 
2010
Category: 
Models and tools
Citation: 
Illback, R., Bates, T., Hodges, C., Galligan, K., Smith, P., Sanders, D., & Dooley, B. (2010). Jigsaw: engaging communities in the development and implementation of youth mental health services and supports in the Republic of Ireland. Journal of Mental Health, 19(5), 422-435.
Publication Type: 
Journal article
Aim: 
To describe the efforts needed to engage communities in systematic processes of planning, programme design, implementation, and evaluation of a community based system of care and support for young people.
Methodology: 
Five communities were selected as demonstration sites - each underwent an intensive readiness assessment and a 7 step community planning process. Information was gathered using focus groups, key informant interviews, community and provider surveys, and geo-mapping of resources with various participant groups.
Participants: 
The membership of the 5 demonstration sites varied from community to community but, in every instance, included young people, family members, community leaders, educators, youth workers, specialised mental health workers, and the local health manager.
Conclusion: 
The study found that there is a need for youth mental health services. It identified that extensive community engagement and planning occurred in all Jigsaw sites and that young people provided invaluable guidance for the design implementation of the sites. The authors stated that creating and sustaining innovation at each site was challenging and required continuous leadership and dialogue.
Keywords: 
community services, youth mental health, programme development, community engagement
Subject Matter: 
n/a
Length: 
14 pages
Public Accessibility: 
Database: Pub Med

Good habits of mind: a mental health promotion initiative for those working with young people in out-of-school settings.

Full title: 
Good habits of mind: a mental health promotion initiative for those working with young people in out-of-school settings.
Author: 
Swinburne, L. & Mason, T.
Year: 
2004
Category: 
Models and tools
Citation: 
Swinburne, L., & Mason, T. (2004). Good habits of mind: a mental health promotion initiative for those working with young people in out-of-school settings. Dublin: National Youth Health Programme.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
To promote the mental health of young people in out-of-school settings.
Methodology: 
In-depth one-to-one interviews (n=4), a consultation/training day on mental health and young people (n=14) and questionnaires were administered prior to and during group meetings for the reference group. One-to-one interviews were held with all members of the key informant group (n=5) and one-to-one communication with the project officer (who was responsible for overseeing this piece of research) through mail, e-mail and phone calls.
Participants: 
The reference group comprised of those who work directly with young people in out-of-school settings. The key informants comprised of a Health Service Executive representative in youth health, a representative from the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Services, two representatives from a Counselling Service for Adolescents and a representative of Mental Health Ireland.
Conclusion: 
This report includes a limited literature review of best practice in mental health promotion with young people. It identifies the information, training and support needs of those working in out-of-school settings when responding to emotional health issues of youth work participants. The report also details a user friendly information resource for those working in the out-of-school setting that contains guidelines and information for sustaining mental health promotion initiatives.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
mental health promotion, initiative, young people, out-of-school
Length: 
106 pages

Evaluation of the MindOut programme in Youthreach centres.

Full title: 
Evaluation of the MindOut programme in Youthreach centres.
Author: 
Clarke, A., Canavan, R. & Barry, M.M.
Year: 
2008
Category: 
Evaluation
Citation: 
Clarke, A., Canavan, R., & Barry, M.M. (2008). Evaluation of the MindOut programme in Youthreach centres. Unpublished report, Health Promotion Research Centre, National University of Ireland, Galway.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
To evaluate the MindOut programme which has been implemented in Youthreach centres in the Health Service Executive West.
Methodology: 
Quasi-experimental.
Participants: 
A total of 53 trainees (21 in the intervention group and 32 in the control group) were involved in the evaluation of the programme. There were 28 males and 25 females altogether with a range of 15 to 20 years.
Conclusion: 
The results demonstrate that the MindOut programme is suitable for implementation in a Youthreach setting and produced positive impacts for the trainees and tutors. The MindOut programme can have positive-short term effects on a diverse group of trainees in the Youthreach setting. The tutors reported an increased awareness of mental health issues, beneficial effects on trainee-tutor relationships and positive impacts on coping strategies amongst the trainees. The evaluation identified that the programme is most suited for young people aged 17 years and over, however, both tutors and trainees expressed a desire for a similar programme for the younger age group.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
evaluation, MindOut, mental health, programme, Youthreach
Length: 
77 pages

Foróige neighbourhood youth projects: enhancing support for young people.

Full title: 
Foróige neighbourhood youth projects: enhancing support for young people.
Author: 
Dolan P,
Year: 
2005
Category: 
Evaluation
Citation: 
Dolan, P. (2005). Foróige neighbourhood youth projects: enhancing support for young people. Health Service Executive & The Galway Child and Family Research Centre.
Publication Type: 
Summary research report
Aim: 
To provide a summary of a study that explored the profile, support needs and mental health of young people attending Foróige/HSE Neighbourhood Youth Projects (NYP) in Counties Mayo and Roscommon.
Methodology: 
Questionnaires and scales (social provisions scale, the adolescent well-being scale and the adolescent perceived events scale).
Participants: 
170 participants with mean age of 13 years
Conclusion: 
This study established a casual association between attendance on the programme and improvement in a young person’s levels of support, mental well-being and coping. NYPs were found to be successful in targeting, engaging and improving the plight of very vulnerable youth requiring help, whilst still caring for those with a lower level of need. For NYP managers and staff, the importance of encouraging service users to enlist more support from positive relationships was worthwhile as it has the potential to hold over time and is possible even among young people coping with various forms of stress.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
neighbourhood youth, support, young people
Length: 
20 pages

Youth mentoring and the parent-young person relationship: considerations for research and practice.

Full title: 
Youth mentoring and the parent-young person relationship: considerations for research and practice.
Author: 
Dolan, P., Canavan, J. & Brady, B.
Year: 
2008
Category: 
Evaluation
Citation: 
Dolan, P., Canavan, J., and Brady, B. (2008) Youth mentoring and the parent-young person relationship: considerations for research and practice. Youth & Policy, 99, 33-42.
Publication Type: 
Peer reviewed journal
Aim: 
To explore findings from two Irish studies of young people and parents attending youth projects and highlight considerations for research and practice in relation to mentoring and the parent-youth relationship.
Methodology: 
Literature review
Participants: 
Case study 1: 172 young people Case study 2: 26 parents of adolescents
Conclusion: 
Study 1 found that the presence of support from parents had mental health and well-being benefits for the young people. Study 2 found that parents identified their young people as important sources of social support. This paper concludes that young people attending NYPs value the emotional and tangible support they receive from their parents and do so despite the ongoing existence of strains in their relationship. Similarly, parents identify their adolescent offspring as an important source of support and selected them as central social network members. BBBS is thus far from an 'add on' intervention for youth coupled with the NYPs. This format has the potential to bring additional benefits for the mentee. Similarly, it suggests that given the requisite resources, a programme to support the parent-child relationship and particularly father-child bond could be utilised.
Keywords: 
youth mentoring, parents, social support, intervention.
Subject Matter: 
n/a
Length: 
9 pages

Teenage mental health: what helps and what hurts? Report on the outcome of consultations with teenagers on mental health.

Full title: 
Teenage mental health: what helps and what hurts? Report on the outcome of consultations with teenagers on mental health.
Author: 
Mc Evoy, O.
Year: 
2009
Category: 
Evaluation
Citation: 
Mc Evoy, O. (2009). Teenage mental health: what helps and what hurts? Report on the outcome of consultations with teenagers on mental health. Dublin: The Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
To consult with young people on ‘teenage mental health’ in order to elicit what ‘hurts’ or negatively impacts on teenage mental health and also to learn what young people feel ‘helps’ or positively impacts on their mental health.
Methodology: 
Consultations and workshops.
Participants: 
In total 277 young people, aged between 12 and 18, attended the consultations and workshops.
Conclusion: 
This study concludes that while young people were very aware of what negatively impacts on their mental health, they also had the capacity to view their mental health in a very positive light and recognise the need to look after their mental well-being. Many of the key areas and practical suggestions made by young people are highlighted throughout the report. The findings of this report have implications for policy and decision-makers as well as for service providers and practitioners in education, local government and the media, parents, family members and indeed young people themselves.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
teenage, mental health, consultations
Length: 
76 pages

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